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The Dark Money Behind Climate Change 'Hippies' Court Case Victory

This rag-tag bag of hippies and 'concerned citizens' are funded by some very unsavoury people.

The government has been defeated in court, for a second time, for allegedly 'not doing enough to meet its targets for cutting greenhouse gas emissions.'


In a case that has reportedly been co-ordinated by organisations including the George Soros Open Society Group Environmental campaigners claimed that the energy minister signed off the government's climate plan without evidence it could be achieved.

Incredibly, the complainants have not had to provide a single piece of evidence that man made climate change exists or, how any measure, would reduce the temperature, because they didn't have to. 

The High Court ruled on Friday that the government will now be required to redraft the plan again,  yet they are still not obliged to do a basic cost/benefit analysis , the only government policy to be undertaken without one.


In response to the ruling a department for Energy Security and Net Zero spokesperson said: "The UK can be hugely proud of its record on climate change. We do not believe a court case about process represents the best way of driving progress towards our shared goal of reaching net zero."


Dark money behind multi-million pound court case. 

The legal challenge was brought by environmental groups Friends of the Earth (funded by George Soros via Open Society), ClientEarth (completely opaque funding records) and The Good Law Project (funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation). Made to look like a group of concerned citizens, the court case is part of a co-ordinated campaign by some of the world's most wealthy and powerful people to corrupt democracy and force through a eco-marxist agenda. 


Tony Bosworth, lead campaigner at Friends of the Earth, claimed it was "an embarrassing day for the government after the unelected group managed to force the government into re-imposing the Net Zero agenda in full. Speaking outside the court to BBC News he said: "What we now need to see is a climate plan which is robust, which is comprehensive and which is fair, which makes sure we meet all our climate targets, and which does that in a way which doesn't leave anybody behind."


International co-ordinated campaign.

The three groups had previously won a case against just two years ago arguing then that its Net Zero Plan was 'not detailed enough' to explain how the UK would cut its emissions - as required by the Climate Change Act. In response the government produced a plan which laid out how each of its policies would cut emissions.  But the campaigners said the former Energy Secretary Grant Shapps did not consider the risks to deliver the plan and signed it off assuming all the policies would be achieved. 


In his judgement, Mr Justice Sheldon said: "It is not possible to ascertain from the materials presented to the Secretary of State which of the proposals and policies would not be delivered at all, or in full."


Later on Friday, the judge is expected to provide a deadline for reviewing the plan.


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