NHS App Secretly Shares Facial Recognition Data With Police for 'Algorithmic Discrimination'


The NHS has admitted that it is sharing facial recognition data from its Vaccine Passport system with police.


An estimated 16 million people have installed the NHS app, which can be used to book GP doctor visits as well as the covid pass as proof of vaccination status in order to travel, and even as a domestic vaccine pass if businesses or events demand it.


While it is possible to use separate means of identification to verify the app, the software has facial recognition as the default, developed by the company iProov, which according to a report in The Guardian, is linked to Conservative Party donors.


According to Breitbart the App records a video and sends the result to iProov to compare the user’s face against government ID photos in order to prove they are indeed who they say they are. The Smartphone App also records information such as date of birth, postcode, phone number, and either a photo of a passport or driving licence.


The NHS are claiming that the data collected is anonymised and put under strict privacy protocols, however, an NHS spokesman admitted to the Guardian that facial recognition and other data is shared with law enforcement agencies, with the caveat that a special panel reviewed such decisions. Yeah right.

An expert in surveillance law warned that domestic and foreign spying agencies will likely try to obtain such data, saying: “If GCHQ acquired it and it was of use, the likely position is that they would share that with the [US] National Security Agency.”


Responding to the report, the lead researcher for the civil liberties campaign group Big Brother Watch, Jake Hurfurt said: “We’re deeply concerned by the secrecy surrounding facial verification and data flows in the NHS app, particularly given the involvement of a private company." He added: “It raises questions about how private and secure anyone’s information is when using facial verification and the NHS login. Anyone who sends personal information to a private company, at the encouragement of the NHS, has a right to know exactly what happens to their data.”


The director of the tech-focused group of lawyers, Foxglove, Cori Crider said: “So long as this system to log into the NHS app is optional then it may be fine but officials definitely shouldn’t be ‘nudging’ patients to log in with their faces to access healthcare." “We should all also reflect on whether we’re heading towards a world where people have to use their faces just to walk into the supermarket or the pharmacy or the nightclub.”


An NHS Digital spokesman tried to defend the App, saying: “The NHS app is helping millions of people to quickly and easily access their NHS Covid Pass, and frees up time for GP surgeries by allowing people to book appointments and order repeat prescriptions online." All good party-propaganda but in truth the App is a digital doorway to a Social Credit System which will govern every aspect of users lives.


“We use facial verification software when people decide to use the app to access their confidential patient data, as part of the high-level NHS login identity verification process which is clearly explained to a