Government Tracking Family Supermarket Spend via NHS App Just the Beginning


But don’t suggest it's like the Chinese Social Credit System or you'll be banned from Facebook and Youtube.


The new plan, earmarked for a January launch, would track families' supermarket spending through an expanded NHS app, and reward those who buy more fruit, vegetables and low calorie meals. They could also gain extra "points" in the app by taking part in organised exercise events or by walking to school. The points could be exchanged for incentives such as discounts and free tickets to events.


A Whitehall source told the Telegraph: "Addressing the country's obesity problem after Covid is one of the key things that the Prime Minister wants to address. There is a whole team in Downing Street working on this and the Prime Minister thinks that we simply cannot go on as before, and that we must now tackle it head on."


They added: "He has been on a very rigorous diet and exercise programme and it is likely he will play a leading role in fronting this whole campaign." The PM's food tsar, Henry Dimbleby, last week suggested the idea of a tax on unhealthy food - which he said would add £1 onto a £90 shop. He said families would encourage food giants to "reformulate" their snacks to avoid being caught by the levy.


This, in case you are still in any doubt, is the start of the Social Credit System that campaigners warned you about. The NHS App will morph into the UK's version of the Social Credit System that Communist China force on their people some years ago. This is no conspiracy theory, this is already in an advanced stage of development.


Vision News has obtained a Government document that claims a need for a 'citizen data system' and throughout the 127 page document extols the virtues of China's system. In fact, China's Social Credit System is referenced some 190 times in it.


Patrick Vallance, one of the co-authors of the paper, states in the forward:

China has prioritised national economic and social security, with strong government coordination and control of citizen data combined with restrictions on international transfers. These values are demonstrated by the Chinese Social Credit System, which is intended to aggregate financial, law enforcement, commercial, social media and other data in order to monitor citizens’ compliance with various obligations, determine sanctions and encourage certain behaviours.

And, just as with the china system, the plan is to scoop up every piece of data you generate. Information is power, and for the Government, power is like crack-cocaine.


The document goes on to list all the data it wants to obtain:


• Unique identifiers (e.g. NHS or passport num